Nigeria Profile

Nigeria, the most populous nation in Africa and the eighth most populous nation in the world with 158 million citizens, is situated in west Africa with a coast line on the Gulf of Guinea in the Atlantic Ocean. It shares land borders with Benin to its west, Chad and Cameroon to its east and Niger to the north.

Following a series of moves towards greater autonomy, Nigeria finally gained its independence from the British on the 1st October 1960 and became the Federal Republic of Nigeria in 1963.

As ever, political instability ensued with coups and counter coups many of which were due to various

ethnic groups wanting independence from a country they held little allegiance to and, even today, Nigeria suffers from ongoing ethnic, tribal and religious tensions that regularly spill out into open conflict. Despite this, after the formation of a new constitution in 1999 ushering in the first civilian government after sixteen years of military rule, the elections of 2007 proved to be the first transition of power from one civilian government to another without the military since independence.

Despite significant oil wealth most of which bypasses the population into the hands of wealthy oil companies resulting in the establishment of a group called MEND (Movement for the Emancipation of the Niger Delta) which is committed to taking the oil industry back for the local Nigerian people and using revenues to help clear up the environmental disaster in the Delta, Nigeria remains one of the poorest countries in the world with 64% of its population living under the poverty line. Nigeria is in 152nd place out of 186 countries and territories in 2013 when ranked in terms of life expectancy, literacy, access to knowledge and the living standards of a country with a life expectancy of around 47years.

HIV/AIDS affects three out of every hundred citizens and there are nearly ten million orphans in the country. Malnutrition affects just under a third of all children, one in five of whom die before their fifth birthday; the reason in part for this is not just poverty but because only around 1% of Nigerian children are immunised against basic childhood illness, and, due to corruption and incompetence, the Nigerian government spends less per capita than virtually any other country in Africa on healthcare.



 
 
 
 
 



Nigeria Profile

Nigeria Profile

Nigeria Profile

Nigeria Profile

 


Nigerian History

Nigerian History

The history about Nigeria told in pictures and video exploring the country's challenges.
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Nigeria Quiz

Nigeria Quiz

Take our Nigeria country quiz and find out how much you really know about Nigeria.
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Volunteer Nigeria

Volunteer Work Nigeria

Check out all the latest African volunteer work placements and opportunities in Nigeria.
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Nigeria Profile: This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 1.0 Generic license

Nigeria Profile

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Eleven million Nigerian children don't attend school with an estimated twelve million children between the ages of 10-14yrs forced into domestic servitude; some even sold to keep their family's head above water with Gabon, Cameroon, Nigger, Italy, Spain, Benin and Saudi Arabia being known destinations. Some parents sell their children in the belief that they will have a better life away from often single houses in urban areas that are home to up to ten other families with no private space, bedrooms and shared sanitation facilities. Most Nigerian children have between 4-5 siblings. For more about Nigeria check out our profile articles above.

 
 


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